Making the Days Count - blog

DO NOT COUNT THE DAYS,

MAKE THE DAYS COUNT.

   

November recognized as Alzheimer's Disease Awareness month

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Tips for late stage  caregivers - Published by Alzheimer's Association  

tip 1: remember that the “self” of the person is not lost

  TIP 2: CONNECT WITH THE “SELF” THROUGH THE SENSES 

TIP 3: INVOLVE THE PERSON YOU CARE FOR IN PROVIDING HANDS-ON CARE

  TIP 4: MONITOR EATING 

 TIP 5: PLAN FOR TOILETING  

 TIP 6: MONITOR GENERAL HEALTH


TIP 7: GET ASSISTANCE WHEN CARE NEEDS EXCEED YOUR LIMITS


TIP 8: MAKE PLANS IN ADVANCE TO FACILITATE A MOVE


TIP 9: CONSIDER USING HOSPICE AND PALLIATIVE CARE SERVICES


TIP 10: PLAN FOR END OF LIFE

In Loving Memory - Elizabeth (Libby) Lynch

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Nov. 13, 1953 – Dec. 13, 2019

 

It is with great sadness that I post about the passing of my dear sweet friend

Elizabeth (Libby) Lynch.

 

Libby passed away Friday, December 13, 2019. 

I first met Libby in April 2018 when I became her hospice volunteer. We instantly became friends. Her contagious smile, laughter and love for life were like a magnet. Libby had a medical background as a nurse. She understood the circumstances of hospice and the benefit it would have for her, but she was determined she would not pass away any time soon. She repeatedly claimed she had much life left to live – and she did. Whereas most patients with her medical issues would find it hard to function and choose to accept the boundaries, she did not. There was nothing she wasn’t willing to attempt if she set her mind to it. She defied most recommendations from her medical staff and her loved ones. One could call this hard-headedness, but I call it determination. She was the most determined person I have ever met. She alone set her boundaries. No one was going to do that for her. Her desire to stay independent and self-sufficient was obvious. I would often attempt to help Libby around her home, but she refused. She wanted our time to be spent talking and discussing plans for the future. She was always interested in what was happening in my life. She was one of my biggest encouragers. Libby worried about everyone else more than she worried about herself. In fact, when she was discharged from hospice last November, she worried for weeks that she had done something wrong or had offended the hospice staff. She did realize the discharge meant that she had not shown a decline in status but insisted she must have done something wrong.  I tried to explain to her why she should be happy about the discharge, but once again she expressed that she had told hospice she wouldn’t die any time soon, so it had to be something she had done.  Libby and I continued our friendship after her discharge. She had made an impact on me and had become a part of my family. During the past year, Libby’s illness started to wear her down physically, but it didn’t break her spirit or her hope. She was still determined she was “going to get through this”. She was once again admitted to hospice in early November of this year. Life in general had become a struggle for her. Libby was still adamant she wanted to be independent and not be a burden on her family. She did not want her family to have to take care of her on a day to day basis. But the time had come for a decision to be made for her own safety. She did not want that. Libby’s passing was not directly caused by her disease but was due to a developed complication. From my understanding, her passing was abrupt and painless. Knowing her the way I did; this was a blessing for her. In her mind, she did not spend time wondering when her passing would come and she did not have to give up her independence by allowing her family to constantly care for her.

 


I initially came into Libby's life to help her... as it turns out, she helped me.  Libby taught me that one's desire to live life can outweigh any medical or physical limitations. In addition, her love and concern for others was beyond the norm and is an example for all of us. 


Libby was a client of Clyde’s Hope Restored, but only after much convincing to receive help. She was our most loyal cheerleader and encourager.

Libby will be greatly missed, but never forgotten.  


Libby is pictured with her fur baby, Morgan, that she loved dearly.



  

Obituary – Elizabeth (Libby) Ann Jones Lynch

Elizabeth (Libby) Ann Jones Lynch, 66, a beloved daughter, mother and friend, passed away Friday, Dec. 13, 2019, at her home in Flowood, Miss.

Visitation will be at Glenwood Funeral Home in Rolling Fork, Miss, on Thursday, December 19, 2019, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. A memorial service will be at 1 p.m. following visitation with Dr. Ron Bird officiating.

Libby was born Nov. 13, 1953, in Ruleville, Miss. She grew up in Rolling Fork and attended Rolling Fork High School where she was a cheerleader, majorette, and voted a high school beauty. She also played the French horn in the marching band and graduated a year early at only the age of 16. Following high school, she attended Mississippi State College for Women in Columbus where she was a member of the Silhouette Social Club. She continued her education at the University of Mississippi where she was an active member of the Delta Gamma Sorority and majored in home economics, graduating with a Bachelor’s of Science degree in 1974. While at Ole Miss, she married her high school sweetheart, Brooks Lynch. They enjoyed ‘living college’ together to the fullest extent with numerous formals, grove days, and football games. Libby enjoyed playing tennis, traveling around the world and spending time

with her family. With her Bachelor’s Degree under her belt and her family growing with the birth of her _rst son, Rob, Libby realized her drive to help others and decided to pursue her true career calling of becoming a nurse. She traveled back to the delta to attend Delta Junior College School of Nursing. There she was initiated into Phi Theta Kappa and graduated with an Associate’s Degree. She began her career in nursing at St. Dominic Hospital in Jackson. With the arrival of her second son, Jay, approaching, she felt a focus on her family was of the utmost importance and took time off to stay at home with her children. As her boys grew up and became young men, she decided to get back into nursing and with that was the ambition to gain more knowledge and go back to school. She moved to Clinton to attend

Mississippi College and received a Bachelor’s of Science degree in Nursing. Following graduation, she worked for the Mississippi Division of Medicaid in Jackson. She retired early to enjoy time with her family once again. She was a member of First Baptist Church of Fannin and enjoyed the fellowship of the members there. Libby was a kind-hearted spirit with a lot of love to share. She loved her family, friends, and sweet pup, Morgan. She enjoyed learning new things and was a fan of her alma mater, Ole Miss. Her eagerness to learn more about someone was her greatest attribute because you could feel her heartfelt care and concern. She talked to her boys every day and loved being a part of their lives and was always excited to know what each day would bring for both of them. She was preceded in death by her father, Albert Ernest Jones and former spouse and lifelong friend, James Brooks Lynch, Sr.

She is survived by her parents, Walton Earl & Betty Jones Blackmon of Brandon, Miss., and two sons, Robert Henry Furr Lynch, III (Kristi) of Chattanooga, Tenn., and James Brooks Lynch, Jr. (Jessica) of Oxford. She also leaves behind two grandchildren who were deeply loved by their “Beebe”, Eleanora Creed Lynch and James Brooks Lynch, III. Her surviving cousins were always sharing her love, Eddie Flowers, Rick Flowers, Rodney Flowers, Mike Flowers, Mary Frances Maxey and Faye Castello.

Memorial contributions may be made to Friends of Children’s Hospital in memory of Elizabeth (Libby) Lynch at 3900 Lakeland Drive, Suite 205, Flowood, MS 39232 or by calling 601-936-0034 or

https://www.friendsofch.org/give/ (https://www.friendsofch.org/give/)